Image from page 520 of “The Dental cosmos” (1891)

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Image from page 520 of “The Dental cosmos” (1891)
Jacob Forever,
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Identifier: dentalcosmos3318whit
Title: The Dental cosmos
Year: 1891 (1890s)
Authors: White, J. D McQuillen, J. H. (John Hugh), 1826-1879 Ziegler, George Jacob, 1821-1895 White, James William, 1826-1891 Kirk, Edward C. (Edward Cameron), 1856-1933 Anthony, L. Pierce (Lovick Pierce), b. 1877
Subjects: Dentistry Dentistry
Publisher: Philadelphia, S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Co
Contributing Library: Yale University, Cushing/Whitney Medical Library
Digitizing Sponsor: The College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the National Endowment for the Humanities

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891, xii, 131.—Ten-nessees dental law. A bill to beentitled An act to regulate the prac-tice of dentistry in the State of Ten- 1 nessee, and to punish violators ! thereof. Dental Headlight, Nash-ville, 1891, xii, 49-52.— Thompson j (A. H.) The descent of expression.Dental Cosmos, Phila., 1891, xxxiii, I 256-262.—Viau (G.) Rapport de lacommission nomm£e pour 6tudier laproposition de M. Godon relative ades modifications aux statuts. Odon-tologie, Par., 1891, xi, 70-82.—Wat-kins (C.) A case in which a platewith four false teeth was swallowed. !J. State Med. Soc, Arkansas, LittleRock, 1890-1, i, 393.—Watson (G.W.) Histology of the teeth of Me- 1 soplodon Layardi. Dental Rec,Lond., 1891, xi, 114.—Weiss (H.) j Ready contours and crowns made ofamalgam. Ibid: 121.—Whitslar(W. H.) A new antiseptic in den-tistry. [Aristol]. Dental Reg., Cin- cin., 1891, xlv, 163-165. Atomic weights. Ibid: 165 — Whitten (D.Frank.) [1843-1891.] Obituary. Den-tal Cosmos, Phila., 1891, xxxiii, 323.

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THE Dental Cosmos Vol. XXXIII. PHILADELPHIA, JULY, 1891. No. 7. IN M EM OR I AM.Dr. James W. White. Died, at Philadelphia, Pa., May 27, 1891, of heart-failure, James WilliamWhite, M.D., D.D.S., A.M., in the sixty-fifth year of his age. A brief notice, inserted in the June number of the Dental Cos-mos just after its issue from the press, announced the death of itseditor, Dr. James W. White. Death came suddenly, unexpectedly. The previous day Dr. Whitewas at the office as usual. He referred several times to an uncom-fortable sensation in the region of the heart, but pursued his dutieswith his accustomed cheerfulness and diligence, and was the last toleave the building. According to his wont he spent the evening withhis family in social converse, and retired without premonition thatwithin a few short hours his eyes would close forever. He awokeunusually early, and spoke to his wife of feeling 4 dyspeptic, butshortly afterward announced that he was better, and would dress forthe day. Whil

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Image from page 170 of “The fables of Æsop, selected, told anew and their history traced” (1894)
Jacob Forever,
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Identifier: fablesofsopsel00kely
Title: The fables of Æsop, selected, told anew and their history traced
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: Kely and Sons, binders Jacobs, Joseph, 1854-1916, ed Heighway, Richard, ill
Subjects: Drawing, British
Publisher: London New York : Macmillan & Company
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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LABOURER lay listening to aNightingales song throughout thesummer night. So pleased was hewith it that the next night he seta trap for it and captured it. Now that Ihave caught thee,3 he cried, thou shaltalways sing to me. We Nightingales never sing in a cage,said the bird. Then Ill eat thee, said the Labourer. I have always heard say that nightingale ontoast is a dainty morsel. Nay, kill me not, said the Nightingale ; but let me free, and Ill tell thee three thingsfar better worth than my poor body. TheLabourer let him loose, and he flew up to a ^ESOPS FABLES 139 branch of a tree and said: Never believe acaptives promise ; thats one thing. Thenagain: Keep what you have. And a thirdpiece of advice is : Sorrow not over what islost forever. Then the song-bird flew away.

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Image from page 182 of “The history of Warren : a mountain hamlet, located among the White hills of New Hampshire” (1870)
Jacob Forever,
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Identifier: historyofwarrenm70litt
Title: The history of Warren : a mountain hamlet, located among the White hills of New Hampshire
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Little, William, 1833-1893
Subjects:
Publisher: Manchester, N.H. : W.E. Moore, printer
Contributing Library: University of Connecticut Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Connecticut Libraries

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ohn Batchelder, Jacob Gale, Abraham Morrill, .Jeremy Webster, The Rt. Hon. TheodoreAtkinson, .Jun., Esq.,* Nathaniel Barrel, Samuel Graves, .John Marsh, Moses Greeley, of Salis-bury, Andrew Wiggin, Esq., Peter Coffin, .Jun.,William Parker, Jr., Esq.;Capt. Thomas Pierce,His Excellency Benning Wentworth a tract of land to contain five hundredacres, as marked B. AV. on the plan, which is to be accounted two of the M^th-in shares. One whole share for the incorporated society for the propagation ofthe gospel in foreign parts. One share for a glebe for the Chui-ch of England,as by law establislied. One share for tlie first settled minister, and one sharefor the benefit of a school in said town forever.Province of New Hampshire, Jan. 28th, 1764. Recorded in the Book of Charters, No. 3, page 80, T. ATKINSON, JUN., Secretary.*1N.H. Hist. Col. 282. MAP OF THE SAID TOWNSHIP. 171 The next fact that meets the eye is, That the same be andhereby is incorporated into a township by the name of WARREN:

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ff/VTWOATH. H<^^-l.^ John Page, Jr., must here have asked his venerable sire whyit was so called. Tradition has it that John Page, Sr., repliedthat he had conversed with the governor about the origin of thename, and that His Excellency informed him that the surveyorsof the Kings Woods, who had visited the township to estab-lish the lines, reported that it was a beautiful land, full of rabbits,where nature had seemingly appropriated a piece of ground totheir breeding and preservation. Dr. Josiah Bartlett, who was learned in Indian as well asmedical lore, interrupted and said he supposed it must be a placegranted by the Gitche Manito, the Indian god who had his home 172 HISTORY OF WARREN. on the summits of the lofty mountains round about, to the redsons of the forest in which to keep all their beastes, fowls, andfish; *^For, said he, all the jolly hunters say that the woods arefull of moose, deer, bear, and other game, that wild ducks swimon the rivers and ponds, and that every strea

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